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    Science blogs in research and popularization of science: why, how and for whom?

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    As the Internet emerged as an efficient channel for sending information and fostering collaborations on a global scale, this unanticipated phenomenon paved the way for a new era of science, namely e-science or digital scholarship. Massive data repositories moved online, academic publications (preprints and articles alike) became searchable across disciplinary boundaries, collaborations grew larger. But the Internet is now developing into so-called web 2.0, where active participation is replacing passive broadcasting: every user can become their own media maker and share videos, images or text. To date, the most popular form for the latter are blogs (short for web-logs). The blog format was originally used for online diaries but has rapidly evolved into a versatile publication and conversation tool. This shift is also being embraced by scientists, on a limited, albeit growing scale. First isolated, then grouped in communities, science bloggers (I use the term to include professional scientists as well as students, journalists, science amateurs, science museums, concerned groups…) have already demonstrated the potential to influence how research is done, results are communicated and the public is reached. Among the many topics that blogs discuss, I will focus here on science and the academic life, thus defining a type of “science blogging” that is effectively turning digital scholarship into conversational scholarship. But in concrete terms, how is that different? And where might this evolution be leading us? I try to shed some light on the matter in the following pages.

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    Title : Science blogs in research and popularization of science: why, how and for whom?
    Author(s) : Antoine Blanchard
    Abstract : As the Internet emerged as an efficient channel for sending information and fostering collaborations on a global scale, this unanticipated phenomenon paved the way for a new era of science, namely e-science or digital scholarship. Massive data repositories moved online, academic publications (preprints and articles alike) became searchable across disciplinary boundaries, collaborations grew larger. But the Internet is now developing into so-called web 2.0, where active participation is replacing passive broadcasting: every user can become their own media maker and share videos, images or text. To date, the most popular form for the latter are blogs (short for web-logs). The blog format was originally used for online diaries but has rapidly evolved into a versatile publication and conversation tool. This shift is also being embraced by scientists, on a limited, albeit growing scale. First isolated, then grouped in communities, science bloggers (I use the term to include professional scientists as well as students, journalists, science amateurs, science museums, concerned groups…) have already demonstrated the potential to influence how research is done, results are communicated and the public is reached. Among the many topics that blogs discuss, I will focus here on science and the academic life, thus defining a type of “science blogging” that is effectively turning digital scholarship into conversational scholarship. But in concrete terms, how is that different? And where might this evolution be leading us? I try to shed some light on the matter in the following pages.
    Keywords : science blogs, pus

    Subject : science blogging
    Area : Web Studies
    Language : English
    Year : 2011

    Affiliations C@fé des sciences
    Editors : Moira Cockell, Jérôme Billotte, Frédéric Darbellay, Francis Waldvogel
    Journal : Common Knowledge: The Challenge of Transdisciplinarity
    Publisher : EPFL Press
    City : Lausanne
    Pages : 219-232
    Isbn : 978-2-940222-32-2

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    Antoine's Peer Evaluation activity

    Trusted by 2
    Downloads 964
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    Collected by 2
    Followed by 9
    • Olivier Ertzscheid, Lecturer, University of nantes.
    • Aalam Wassef, Publisher, Founder of Peer Evaluation, Galerie Conradi.
    • Gloria Origgi, Research Fellow, CNRS, Institut Nicod, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Ecole des Hautes Etudes, Paris.
    • Josmel Pacheco-Mendoza, Research Fellow, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos.
    • Guillaume Dupuy d'Angeac, Publisher, Collective Developments, HEC Alumni, Peerevaluation.
    • Ronald Ojino, Student, Master Level, Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology.
    • Soledad Martínez, Lecturer, Depto. Ciencias Sociales, Universidad del Bío-Bío, Chiillán, Chile..
    • Clement Levallois, Post Doctorate, Rotterdam School of Management, E-humanities group of the KNAW, Erasmus Studio, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Gephi Consortium.
    • Mohsen Ghasemi, Other, Iran.
    Following... 4
    • Gloria Origgi, Research Fellow, CNRS, Institut Nicod, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Ecole des Hautes Etudes, Paris.
    • Olivier Ertzscheid, Lecturer, University of nantes.
    • Peer Evaluation, Publisher, Peer Evaluation, Collective Developments.
    • Clement Levallois, Post Doctorate, Rotterdam School of Management, E-humanities group of the KNAW, Erasmus Studio, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Gephi Consortium.

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